EASY MENFI

TIVITTI
LA BAMBINA
LUCORI
NOTRIX
RIVEDIBILE

TERROIR

DIETRO LE CASE
COSTE AL VENTO
AREMI
FUORIZONA
MICROCOSMO

HAND MADE

AMMANO
CIATU
ALBAMARINA
NINARE

TRADITION

ALTRIMENTI
CODA DELLA FOCE
AZIMUT
LA VOTA
Wild yeast harvest 2016
Pin It

Wild yeast and spontaneous fermentations, which are today one of the key points of the natural wine movement, are linked to ancestral Mediterranean traditions that remain a source of culture and inspiration for many winegrowers all over the world.

Today I posted this photo on Facebook, with that caption: “The force of wild yeast only three days after the harvest surprised me, because it normally takes this much time only to see the first bubbles. On this vintage, the fermentation is powerful enough to lift the tank’s cover, and to throw it on the floor. I am lucky to witness a miracle, my eyes and heart full of wonder.”
In a minute, Shelly, my friend and sister from Colorado, wrote that: “Damn your yeast, she is a beast!

I had never thought about the fact that yeast is a masculine word in Italian, but feminine in English, and I just LOVE that. Now I think that English is right, and Italian is wrong. Because the power of life, of reproduction and of creation is, and always has been, in women's hands.

All the ancient cultures of the Mediterranean worshipped Demeter, the personification of primeval Mother Earth, and her daughter Persephone, who they also called Kore, or “the Maiden”. In the mythological traditions, Hades, the god of the underworld, kidnapped Persephone because he was so in love with her that he could not live without seeing her beauty. Her disappearing from the Earth caused long ages of grief, drought and misery: the trees stopped to give fruits, all the crops dried out, and the Earth soon became a desolate and infertile land.
Demeter was so desperate for the long famine that she ran around for years to look for her daughter. When she finally found her, she came to an agreement with Hades: Persephone should return to the Earth for six months during spring and summer, so that the human race would survive thanks to her fertility, and she would come back to the underworld during fall and winter.
From that moment on, Demeter became the goddess of abundance (Malophoros, or The Fruit Bringer) and the goddess who regulate the chaos of Nature and the feminine fertility (Tesmophoros, or The Law Bringer).

 

  • Demetra greca di Monte Adranone

    Demetra greca di Monte Adranone

  • Demetra sicana di Monte Adranone

    Demetra sicana di Monte Adranone

  • La Tanit di Kerkouane

    La Tanit di Kerkouane

  • La Dea di Morgantina

    La Dea di Morgantina

  • Demetra e Kore a Morgantina

    Demetra e Kore a Morgantina

I believe that yeast is the icon of Mother Earth’s power and magnificence: she gets dormant during the winter and returns every spring to impregnate all the fruits of nature with the power of creation that is able to transform grapes into the miraculous gift of wine.

 

Tags: lieviti indigeni, fermentazione spontanea, vino naturale, Demetra, Terre Sicane, lieviti selvaggi, Kore, Morgantina, Monte Adranone

THE SHORT STORY

THE SHORT STORY

Grape variety: Inzolia grown in Dietro le Case vineyard
Soil: clay soil with calcareous components, very rich in limestones and sea minerals
Vineyard: planted in 1960s, head-trained bush vines
Winemaking: skin contact for 48 hours in steel tanks
Alcoholic fermentation: spontaneous, with wild yeast
Malolactic fermentation: spontaneous
Refining: 4 months on fine lees, in steel tanks
Aging: one oak barrel, where it ages in perpetuum with its sediment
Average production: a few dozen bottles every some years

Download wine sheet

WINEMAKING

The grapes are handpicked the first half of September, when they are fully ripe. The traditional pruning system - called "a pezzo e spalla" - and the age of the vines, allow slow constant ripening cycles and a great aromatic concentration.

The fermentation is spontaneous, with 2 days skin contact. After soft pressing, the fermentation continues for 8 days in steel tanks. After malolactic is completed, the wine refines on fine lees for about 4 months and is then racked into one single oak barrel, where it ages in perpetuum with its sediment.

The wine is bottled directly from the barrel no more than 2-3 times every decade.

TASTING NOTES

Altrimenti has a bright amber color, enlivened by golden hues. Its nose is predominantly tertiary, where fruity notes of apricot and ripe figs blend onto an intense and aromatic herbal background, enriched by roasted and dried nuts.

It is dry and full bodied to the palate, with a distinct savory personality that harmoniously meets a tannic finish.

SERVING TEMPERATURE: 54 - 58 °F
Pour Altrimenti in wide glasses, at a fresh but not chilled temperature.
Please avoid freezers and blast chillers, as well as a prolonged time in your home refrigerator: this wine is not filtered nor fined, and any temperature below 40 °F will mortify its complex aromas.

This site uses cookies and third-party cookies to provide you with a better experience and service.
When navigating or using our services, you agree to our use of them. You can change your cookie settings at any time.